Username:
Password:
Banner

Acier (chromoly)

Steel

  • Très confortable
  • Très Durable
  • Réparable
  • Solide
  • Very Comfortable
  • Durable
  • Repairable
  • Solid

Aluminium

Aluminum Alloys

  • Léger
  • Rigide
  • Peu dispendieux
  • Light
  • Stiff
  • Inexpensive

Titane

Titanium

  • Très léger
  • Très confortable
  • Durable
  • Réparable
  • Very Light
  • Very Comfortable
  • Durable
  • Repairable

Fibre de carbone

Carbon Fiber

  • Très léger
  • Très rigide
  • Confortable verticalement
  • Very Light
  • Very Stiff
  • Vertically Comfortable

Information on Bike Frame Materials

Materials:

Steel (chromoly)

Steel frames are often built using various types of steel alloys including chromoly. They are strong, easy to work, and relatively inexpensive, but denser (heavier) than many other structural materials. Steel tubing in traditional standard diameters is often less rigid than oversized tubing in other materials (due more to diameter than material); this flex allows for some shock absorption giving the rider a slightly less jarring ride compared to other more rigid tubings such as oversized aluminum.

Cheaper steel bicycle frames are made of mild steel, such as might be used to manufacture automobiles or other common items. However, higher-quality bicycle frames are made of high strength steel alloys (generally chromium-molybdenum, or "chromoly" steel alloys) which can be made into lightweight tubing with very thin wall gauges. One of the most successful older steels was Reynolds "531", a manganese-molybdenum alloy steel. More common now is 4130 ChroMoly or similar alloys. Reynolds and Columbus are two of the most famous manufacturers of bicycle tubing. A few medium-quality bicycles used these steel alloys for only some of the frame tubes. An example was the Schwinn Le tour (at least certain models), which used chromoly steel for the top and bottom tubes but used lower-quality steel for the rest of the frame.

A high-quality steel frame is lighter than a regular steel frame. This lightness makes it easier to ride uphill, and to accelerate on the flat. Also many riders feel thin-walled lightweight steel frames have a "liveliness" or "springiness" quality to their ride.

Among steel frames, using butted tubing reduces weight and increases cost. Butting means that the wall thickness of the tubing changes from thick at the ends (for strength) to thinner in the middle (for lighter weight).

Back To Top
Aluminum Alloys

Aluminum alloys have a lower density and lower strength compared with steel alloys, however, possess a better strength-to-weight ratio, giving them notable weight advantages over steel. Early aluminum structures have shown to be more vulnerable to fatigue, either due to ineffective alloys, or imperfect welding technique being used. This contrasts with some steel and titanium alloys, which have clear fatigue limits and are easier to weld or braze together.

Aluminum's attractive strength to weight ratio as compared with steel, and certain mechanical properties, assure it a place among the favored frame-building materials (for example, a very strong rider, who does lots of hill-climbing, may prefer the stiffness of aluminum). Some disadvantages are that an aluminum frame doesn't have the same "feel" to an experienced cyclist as a steel frame, excessive ride harshness in lower quality frames, and decreased ease of repairability.

Aluminum bicycle tubing is a compromise, offering a wall thickness to diameter ratio that is not of utmost efficiency, but gives us oversized tubing of more reasonable aerodynamically acceptable proportions and good resistance to impact. This results in a frame that is significantly stiffer than steel. While many riders claim that steel frames give a smoother ride than aluminum because aluminum frames are designed to be stiffer, that claim is of questionable validity: the bicycle frame itself is extremely stiff vertically because it is made of triangles, the sides of which do not change in length under stress. Conversely, this very argument calls the claim of aluminium frames having greater vertical stiffness into question. On the other hand, lateral and twisting (torsional) stiffness improves acceleration and handling in some circumstances.

Aluminum frames are generally recognized as having a lower weight than steel, although this is not always the case. An inexpensive aluminum frame may be heavier than an expensive steel frame. Butted aluminum tubes—where the wall thickness of the middle sections are made to be thinner than the end sections—are used by some manufacturers for weight savings. Non-round tubes are used for a variety of reasons, including stiffness, aerodynamics, and marketing. Various shapes focus on one or another of these goals, and seldom accomplish all.

Back To Top
Titanium

Titanium is perhaps the most exotic and expensive metal commonly used for bicycle frame tubes. It combines many desirable characteristics, including a high strength to weight ratio and excellent corrosion resistance. Reasonable stiffness (roughly half that of steel) allow for many titanium frames to be constructed with "standard" tube sizes comparable to a traditional steel frame, although larger diameter tubing is becoming more common for more stiffness. As many titanium frames can be much more expensive than similar steel alloy frames, cost can put them out of reach for many cyclists. Many common titanium alloys and even specific tubes were originally developed for the aerospace industry.

Titanium frame tubes are almost always joined by Tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding , although vacuum brazing has been used on early frames.It is more difficult to machine than steel or aluminum, which sometimes limits its uses and also raises the effort (and cost) associated with this type of construction.

Back To Top
Carbon Fiber

Carbon fiber, a composite material, is an increasingly popular non-metallic material commonly used for bicycle frames. lthough expensive, it is light-weight, corrosion-resistant and strong, and can be formed into almost any shape desired. The result is a frame that can be fine-tuned for specific strength where it is needed (to withstand pedaling forces), while allowing flexibility in other frame sections (for comfort). Custom carbon fiber bicycle frames may even be designed with individual tubes that are strong in one direction (such as laterally), while compliant in another direction (such as vertically). The ability to design an individual composite tube with properties that vary by orientation cannot be accomplished with any metal frame construction commonly in production.

Many racing bicycles built for individual time trial races and triathlons employ composite construction because the frame can be shaped with an aerodynamic profile not possible with cylindrical tubes, or would be excessively heavy in other materials. While this type of frame may in fact be heavier than others, its aerodynamic efficiency may help the cyclist to attain a higher speed and consequently outweigh other considerations in such events.

Back To Top

Informations Sur Les Matériaux Des Câdres

Matériaux:

L'acier (chromoly)

Dans le domaine des tubes, l'utilisation de tubes butted réduit le poids mais engendre un coût de fabrication plus élevé. Les tubes butted sont des tubes dits "à épaisseur variable" dont l'épaisseur de la paroi varie pour être plus importante sur les extrémités du tube (pour la rigidité) qu'en son centre (pour le poids).

Les cadres des vélos à bas prix sont constitués d'acier basique (à simple teneur en carbone, également appelé Mild_Steel), comme ceux utilisés par exemple dans la construction de véhicules ou d'autres objets communs.

Cependant, les cadres de qualité sont conçus avec des alliages d'acier très endurants (généralement de l'acier Chrome-Molybdène, communément appelé chromoly), qui donnent des tubes très légers possédant des parois extrêmement fines.

Un des alliages d'aciers les plus connu était le Reynolds "531", un alliage Manganèse-Molybdène. Reynolds et Columbus sont deux des fabricants de tubes les plus reconnus dans le domaine du cycle.

Retour en haut
L'aluminium

A diamètre égal, les tubes en aluminium sont moins rigides que les tubes en acier, mais également moins lourds. Pour compenser ce manque de rigidité, les tubes en aluminium ont un diamètre volontairement très supérieur à celui de leurs homologues en acier, ce qui donne des tubes dits Oversized. Cette augmentation de diamètre aboutit généralement à un cadre significativement plus rigide que ceux en acier. Cette rigidité n'est pas toujours un atout, puisque la légère flexibilité des cadres en aciers offre meilleur confort que ceux en aluminium. D'un autre côté, rigidité est synonyme de nervosité et de précision.

Les alliages d'aluminium sont moins denses et endurants que les alliages d'aciers (ratio d'environ 2/3). Contrairement aux alliages d'acier ou de titane, qui possèdent une limite d'élasticité élevée, ce qui leur donne une bonne tenue en fatigue, l'aluminium a une limite élastique plus faible. Ainsi, même les plus faibles contraintes issues d'une utilisation normale du cadre finiront par l'endommager si elles sont trop souvent répétées.

Les cadres en aluminium sont généralement facilement reconnaissables à leur légèreté face aux cadres en aciers, même si ce n'est pas systématique. Un cadre bas de gamme en aluminium peut être plus lourd qu'un bon cadre en acier. Les tubes Butted contribuent à obtenir des cadres plus légers. L'utilisation de profils spécifiques pour les tubes (ovales, carrés) et de formes travaillées (haubans cintrés) permettent d'avoir des cadres en alliage d'aluminium plus rigides et légers.

Retour en haut
Le titane

Le titane est certainement le métal le plus exotique et le plus cher qui est communément employé dans la construction des tubes de cadre. Il combine de nombreuses caractéristiques très recherchées, comme un très bon ratio solidité/poids ou une excellente résistance à la corrosion.

La relative rigidité du titane (quoique moitié inférieure à celle de l'acier) permet d'employer dans la majorité des cas des tubes de diamètre correct, même si des tubes de diamètre supérieur permettent d'améliorer significativement cette rigidité.

Beaucoup d'alliages de titane et mêmes des tubes spécifiques ont été originellement conçus pour l'industrie aérospatiale.

Retour en haut
Le fibre de carbone

Le fibre de carbone, matériau composite, est le seul matériau non métallique utilisé couramment dans la fabrication des cadres de vélo. Malgré son prix important, la fibre de carbone est très légère, résiste à la corrosion, est très résistante, et peut être formée dans presque toutes les formes désirées. Le cadre est alors profilé et élaboré précisément pour une rigidité maximale sur la répartitions des efforts, alors qu'il sera flexible sur d'autres sections (pour le confort et une meilleure motricité). Les cadres en tubes de fibre de carbones peuvent même employer des tubes ayant des propriétés différentes (rigidité suivant un effort donné) en fonction des efforts qu'ils devront supporter. Cette conception de tubes composites ayant des propriétés variantes suivant l'orientation de l'effort ne peut pas être reproduite avec des alliages ferreux.

Certains cadres en fibre de carbone utilisent des tubes cylindriques qui sont collés entre eux à l'aide de manchons, en utilisant un procédé semblable à celui employé pour les cadres aciers à manchons. D'autres cadres font appel à une construction monocoque, en une seule pièce.

Alors que ces cadres en matériaux composites sont excessivement légers et nerveux, ils ont une résistance aux chocs nettement inférieure aux cadres en métal, et sont donc plus sensibles aux dommages en cas de chute ou d'accident. Il parait également que la fibre de carbone soit sujet à un phénomène de fatigue.

De nombreux vélos destinés à la course ou aux triathlons utilisent une construction composite pour gagner en aérodynamisme (la forme du cadre peut être travaillée dans ce sens), qui même si le gain en poids devient perfectible, permet au cycliste d'atteindre des vitesses de pointe supérieures à celles de ses concurrents.

Retour en haut
167 Wellington St., Gatineau, Quebec, J8X 2J3, Phone: 819-772-2919, Fax: 819-772-4774